Read more about the article How Tai Chi Relax your shoulders; a hundred explanations
Tai Chi

How Tai Chi Relax your shoulders; a hundred explanations

In the words of Grandmaster Yang Chengfu in "Ten Essentials of Taijiquan": "Sink the shoulders and drop the elbows. To sink the shoulders means to relax and allow them to hang down. If they cannot be relaxed and allowed to hang down, then the two shoulders will lift up, and the qi will also rise, causing the entire body to lose strength. To drop the elbows means to let the elbows hang down loosely. If the elbows are raised, the shoulders cannot sink, and the opponent can easily break your structure, similar to the external martial arts' concept of breaking power."

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Read more about the article The basic principles of practicing Tai Chi Chuan’s upper, middle, and lower body coordination. – Hong Jun Sheng
Tai Chi

The basic principles of practicing Tai Chi Chuan’s upper, middle, and lower body coordination. – Hong Jun Sheng

Upper Body          From the top of the head to the neck area, the upper body includes the eyes, ears, nose, mouth, tongue, teeth, and facial region. The upper body serves as the guiding mechanism for the overall body movement, as explained below: Neck            The Baihui acupoint at the center of the head's top is the center of "ding jin" (upward force). It should be slightly raised, as if suspended. Properly managing "ding jin" results in a light and agile body, embodying the concept of "full body lightness."

Continue ReadingThe basic principles of practicing Tai Chi Chuan’s upper, middle, and lower body coordination. – Hong Jun Sheng
Read more about the article The basic principles of practicing Tai Chi Chuan for the shoulders, elbows, hands, wrists, and fingers. – Hong Junsheng
Tai Chi

The basic principles of practicing Tai Chi Chuan for the shoulders, elbows, hands, wrists, and fingers. – Hong Junsheng

Shoulders: Should be relaxed, resembling the arms hanging from the shoulders like ropes. This not only keeps the arms and hands flexible but also maintains the body's balance even when the arms are moved or pressed by external forces. Elbows: Elbows should frequently sink with the relaxation of the shoulders. The extension and contraction of the arms should shift direction from the movement of relaxed shoulders and sinking elbows. This ensures that the body's power reaches the hands appropriately and can adapt to changes when facing an opponent.

Continue ReadingThe basic principles of practicing Tai Chi Chuan for the shoulders, elbows, hands, wrists, and fingers. – Hong Junsheng
Read more about the article Tai Chi Silk reeling energy
martial secrets

Tai Chi Silk reeling energy

The term "缠法" (Chán Fǎ) was proposed by Chen Xin, also known as Chen Xinyi, in his book "Illustrated Explanation of Chen-Style Taijiquan." He stated, "Taijiquan also involves 'Chán Fǎ' (Entwining Techniques)." He further emphasized, "Without understanding this, one cannot comprehend the essence of the martial art." Chen Xin affirmed the significant position of "Chán Fǎ" in the Chen-style Taijiquan routines and elaborated on its various forms: "there are 'Jin Chán' (Advancing Entwining), 'Tui Chán' (Retreating Entwining), 'Zuo Chán' (Left Entwining), 'You Chán' (Right Entwining), 'Shang Chán' (Upward Entwining), 'Xia Chán' (Downward Entwining), 'Li Chán' (Inward Entwining), 'Wai Chán' (Outward Entwining), 'Shùn Chán' (Clockwise Entwining), 'Nì Chán' (Counterclockwise Entwining), 'Dà Chán' (Large Entwining), and 'Xiǎo Chán' (Small Entwining)."

Continue ReadingTai Chi Silk reeling energy